Pete Townsend of TheStartup.com On The Funds Industry In Ireland And On Helping Tech Startups

Pete Townsend of TheStartup.com On The Funds Industry In Ireland And On Helping Tech Startups

July 25 2019

Pete Townsend is a fascinating guy.

An influential leader with an extensive career in asset management, asset servicing and advisory, he regularly delivers insight as a keynote speaker, moderator, MC, and podcaster. We spoke with Pete about his background, how he helps tech businesses via TheStartup.com, and about the future of the funds industry in Ireland.

For a special edition of the Your Pursuit Of Happiness podcast, Paul spoke with Pete about his background, how he helps tech businesses, and about the future of the funds industry in Ireland.

 

Special Guest Interview: Pete Townsend

We spoke with Pete about his background, how he helps tech businesses, and about the future of the funds industry.

Check out TheStartup.com and also Pete's very cool entrepreneurship podcast: Money Never Sleeps. You'll find that at www.moneyneversleeps.ie.

Pete Townsend – The Background

Paul Smyth:
Obviously, you have a big background in terms of funds and the fintech side as well in particular, in your more recent life. Can you give us a bit of background about yourself?

Pete Townsend:
Sure. As you mentioned, I've got a long background in the funds' industry. Right now, I am the founder of Norio Ventures, and transitioning the business into a business called TheStartup.com with a strong venture capital component to it as well, which is the whole reason I set up Norio Ventures three years ago was that before I left BNP Paribas in 2016, I had been inspired by the captains of venture capital, just with some of the experiences I had been through in my final year at BNP Paribas where I was Global Head of Product Development for the Hedge Fund Servicing Business and, previously, had been COO of the BNP Paribas Fund Services, Dublin operation.

Pete Townsend:
In that last year, my boss said to me in Paris, "Pete, go out into the fintech space in Ireland and see if there's anything worth investing in." I found it was worth investing in me. He set me down a path to my own exit, which was convenient! When I left, I thought I'd just waltz right into the world of consulting. Sure, that guy, that commercially friendly COO, no problem. What I learned quickly was that I was like a little boy lost in the woods and that just because you're a successful COO and good at product development... Anyway, it doesn't mean you can go out and be on the front foot and be a professional consultant all the time. It's night and day. Anyway, where I really found my inspiration is what I wanted to start doing anyway, which working with startups.

Pete Townsend:
I knew that I wasn't going to be able to just waltz into venture capital, which was the ambition of launching Norio Ventures, without actually learning the startup mentality. I've spent the last nearly three years now doing just that, working with 16 different startups across Ireland, the US and the UK, a little bit into the continental Europe, helping them with getting customers, the three Ps of people, product and platform with process being in the middle of all that and, also, regulation and getting funding. That's what I do right now.

Pete Townsend:
I'm still connected to the funds' industry, having my first real gig being running the Brexit Committee for Irish Funds. I stayed close. I also stayed close to the Adminovate Conference that I do with the guys from Fund Recs where we pull together 250 to 300 people, we've done it twice now, January last year, January this year, to get people thinking about the future of the funds' industry, where things are headed.

Paul Smyth:
Nice segue!

Pete Townsend:
Thank you!

The Future Of The Funds Industry In Ireland

Paul Smyth:
Where do you see the landscape in Ireland at the minute and the funds' industry as a whole?

Pete Townsend:
Ireland's built up such an impressive business here. It's something like close to 40,000 people between those directly employed in the fund industry and those that are on the sidelines of that. The four and a half, whatever is it, five trillion dollars under administration here, excellent for a country with five million people that built this up. What Ireland doesn't really get to see is what is happening in the mainstream asset management community. Okay?

Pete Townsend:
We are very much a middle and back-office operation here. Now, with Brexit, there are tons of UK managers that are setting up in Ireland. They're being referred to as front office roles, but they're really the more perfunctory front office roles around compliance, around risk management and those types of things. What we're not going to see all that much of is the trading operation, the portfolio management, the investment decision making.

Pete Townsend:
Exactly. All of that will still happen where all that talent is. Now, there's a big expat community all over the world, a lot in London. Would they like to come home? Some might, some may not. Are they in New York? Some may want to come home, some may not. Right? Seeing these opportunities, that's more of a 10 to 15-year arc than it is a two to three-year arc after Brexit. I think Ireland's very much going to stay middle and back-office focused for the next, at least, five years if not longer.

Pete Townsend:
What I'm saying about not seeing the mainstream asset management community is the headaches of the asset management community right now where you've got regulatory overload. You've got a huge web of legacy technology that is weighing you down. You've got complexity all over the industry, across all the different parties involved in one single investor transaction when it comes to independent financial advisors, individual investors, third party distributors, fund platforms and the whole value chain of the fund investment process.

Pete Townsend:
What's happened in some of the major markets, so take London, for example, I think I mentioned to you, I'm advising a group now called Fund Admin Chain. The experience with them has been that, being in the middle of that community in London, especially at the front office side where these people are dealing with these headaches every day and not just being part of a business that actually is the pure operational side.

Paul Smyth:
At the coalface really.

Pete Townsend:
Exactly.

Pete Townsend:
You've got, I don't know, 100 big-name asset managers in London, probably more. Amongst those 100, there's at least 25 or 30 where they've got a CTO or a chief innovation officer or a COO or someone even in the front office that has already tweaked that the future of the funds' industry is no longer 80,000 different individual ledgers, and that application of distributed ledger technology to the funds' industry has started to happen. Now, it's happening in small pockets. It's happening in small circles. There are players like Calastone that are moving ahead on that. That's just DLT internally for them. It's not everybody.

Pete Townsend:
This is saying, "Forget about the Bitcoin blockchain, because that is not scalable." That is not something that you can actually apply to capital markets. This is saying, "What are some of the finer components of, what you call, a multi-party consensus model?" Where a number of us can all be a part of the same network and say, "I know that you can see what I can see in terms of the ledger, this distributed ledger. I don't need to reconcile to anybody, because we all have the same records." We don't know everything that you've done. We don't know anything that other people have done if you or I am only party to a trade.

Pete Townsend:
What's happened is that everybody knows that, yet, the other guys that have done a trade know that they've got the same details. Right? Just having that trust, that knowledge, that transparency is big. This is where things are headed. It's already headed that way in other industries. The number one area to be knocked out, sorry, not to be knocked out, the number one area that is due for transformation is transfer agency. There are so many record-keeping functions in transfer agency that are not that necessary when it comes to having... Because if you have an investor that has a record, you have their advisor that has a record, you have a third-party distributor that has a record, you have a fund platform that has a record, all from one transaction. Then, the transfer agent has a record as well.

Pete Townsend:
That's five copies of the same transaction, the same holding. It can all be mutualized as one, and then obviously distributed. That is the first thing that can go. That opens up, what, at least 10% of the funds' industry in Ireland. Reuse, retrain, give people new capabilities. To step back from the technical side of it, Paul, to summarize that, I think that technology is moving incredibly quickly.

Pete Townsend:
I think that Ireland's going to be on the receiving end of it, and it will be done to us here if we... You can say if we don't move quicker on the technology side, but there is no incentive for us to move quicker on the technology side. In the funds' industry, the funds' industry, to me, is about you've got the people side of it, as I said, built up this great industry. A lot of people have jobs, a lot of people have great career opportunities, a lot of people have development opportunities, things are all positive in that regard.

Pete Townsend:
Being an operationally-focused industry means that we're not going to have many of the heads of innovation based in Ireland. We're not going to have many of the heads of distributed ledger technology-based in Ireland or the Heads of Digital based in Ireland. They're going to be in other places in driving this stuff forward. Perhaps the bigger players, like a State Street, a BNY Mellon, Citi, J.P Morgan, that'll have these entry points into things like R3, into things like Clearmatics or Finality which is a utility settlement coin project that's coming to market, they're plugged into it. Hopefully, they'll engage their Irish operations in those projects to bring things to market.

Pete Townsend:
Is there a central point of focus driving Ireland forward on that to go out to the heads of these businesses in Ireland and say, "Here's what's coming guys?" Is there anything that we can do here at the local level to drive things forward? I absolutely know there is, what we can do. Is there that incentive there for the main decision-makers in Ireland within the funds' industry, within each one of the players, to actually say, "You know what? Listen, we're going to put," and it's a not money thing, but say, "We're going to put 100K into this." Whatever it is, something as a group effort to move everybody forward, I just don't think that incentive is there.

Ireland’s Opportunity

Paul Smyth:
Where's the opportunity then for Ireland specifically within all of that?

Pete Townsend:
The way I always tried to run things at BNP Paribas, Paul, was to say, "Let's create capacity. Let's take stock of all of the opportunities to automate things, and let's measure that quarterly and see how we can improve." If we could measure people's capacity, we could see where the excess capacity then moved, where we created that excess capacity. When we did create that excess capacity, we took people out of those teams and we moved them into a technology team that was just purely focused on improving things again and taking things to the next level of automation.

Pete Townsend:
Big, new mandates that were coming in that were, all of a sudden, growing from 100 people to 130 people over the course of a few months was necessary, to say, "What's your long-term plan to be able to handle that level of growth?" I said, "Listen. Love to grow this operation and maybe 200, 250 people max and then stop, and then be able to support the growth of the business, because we are so highly automated, by getting new business but without hiring new people." That wasn't saying because we were hiring people in India or in Eastern Europe. That was just saying that we created the scalability here where instead of in the old days where we had to go hire 10 people, we now only have to hire one or perhaps only half of one.

Paul Smyth:
Because of technology and automation.

Pete Townsend:
Because technology has taken over. There are huge opportunities to do that here in Ireland, but it is a discipline. It is focused. It is long-term. It is measure, measure, measure, change, change, change. I'm absolutely positive that my old colleagues are doing things like this. I was just visiting an asset manager today here in Dublin and talking about blockchain, distributed ledger technology. They were talking about their robotics process automation project and RPA and artificial intelligence projects.

Pete Townsend:
One of the things I said to them, I got their consent, I got their heads nodding when I said it, I said, "Listen. What I really like about your guys' project is that it feels like it is long-term. It isn't something that you'll take a break quarterly because you got a big, new mandate coming in. This feels like it's real commitment, that you're doing it forever." That's what it needs to be in the funds' industry.

Paul Smyth:
Commitment.

Pete Townsend:
Right. I've seen far too many projects come and go where it's like, "All right. Listen, let's get this thing rolling. In September, we're going to get it all teed up to have a big investment in January that is just purely focused on improving our own internal operations and bringing our automation levels way up." That project gets blown to bits when someone wins a big, new client and you got to actually keep doing things the old way.

Paul Smyth:
Yeah, I've seen it.

Pete Townsend:
Because it's safe. Instead of going out and hiring a technology expert with some strong leadership skills to run the project, you're going to hire another ops person to lead the team. The opportunity, I think, is incremental.

How To Keep Up To Date

Pete Townsend:
Be extremely well plugged into what's going on and there are such easy ways to do that. You read The Finanser.org, which is Chris Skinner's daily blog, you can plug into what's going on. You look at Finextra every day, you can figure out what's going on. You can do that in five to 10 minutes. I do it every morning. If you want to pay the 273 Euro per year for the FT, which I do, you can collate that down and curate that down into the topics that are most important to you. Mine are fintech, the funds' industry, blockchain DLT, Bitcoin is in there as well, cryptocurrency, private equity, venture capital and then technology.

Pete Townsend:
I get that nice curated list of about 25 to 30 articles a day. I might read seven or eight in the first 20 minutes of my day, and I'm plugged in. Then, when I figure out the things that really interest me, I just look at the website. You need that hard graft commitment to getting better all the time and becoming more automated. As Paul Noonan says... don't outsource it, tech it. Don't move it, tech it. You also need to be extremely well plugged into what's going on out there in the market in general, not just the funds' industry. You got to look beyond the funds' industry into capital markets, in general, to see how people are using technology to make jobs better.

Is Blockchain A Threat To Fintech?

Paul Smyth:
Regarding fintech and blockchain - is blockchain a threat to fintech if you're not using it?

Pete Townsend:
If you look at where things have come from, blockchain, the first incantation of it is the Bitcoin blockchain. Right? That is 11 years old now.

Paul Smyth:
Yes.

Pete Townsend:
It has proven successful. Now, take away whatever you want from it, from Silk Road, from illicit activities, from the venom I get spit at me when people talk to me about this, said, "It's all about drug dealing and money laundering," it's like, "Well, the easiest way to launder money is with something called the $1 bill or the $100 bill." Anyway, the Bitcoin blockchain and Bitcoin itself is the first cryptocurrency, digital money. It operates on a consensus mechanism so that you don't have a double spend. You can have a digital thing that only exists in the virtual world that cannot be copied. That enables it to be a piece of value. Now, that value is up and down, up and down all the time. We're still very early days, even though it's 11 years in, in the maturity cycle of cryptocurrency. Okay?

Pete Townsend:
On the other side, you have the Love Blockchain, Hate Crypto crew. What they're saying is: "I've looked at blockchain, this critical part of the Bitcoin framework, and said, 'I really like that. I think there are pieces of it that are completely applicable to the financial markets. I'm going to take distributed ledger technology,'" which is the umbrella term for blockchain because there are many different types of blockchain technologies. It's referred to as distributed ledger technology, "I'm going to take elements of that." That was like, "Wow, the world is not actually flat." That was the discovery.

Pete Townsend:
Like Christopher Columbus sailed to the Dominican Republic and thought it was the West Indies, what we're saying is that, yes, the world is not flat but you do not need to get three boats to sail to the Dominican Republic, or Hispaniola as he called it. We can go a different way with this. We can go over the North Pole. I don't know where I'm going with this analogy!

Paul Smyth:
It's much like the transfer agency that you talked about.

Pete Townsend:
Yes.

Paul Smyth:
It's five different records of the same transaction.

Pete Townsend:
Exactly, exactly. The whole idea is to say, "I can mutualize this database." HSBC are doing it internally with they built this thing called FX Everywhere, so that they can have one record of an FX transaction internally between all their subsidiaries. Every single day, they hedge all their FX exposure across all the HSBC subsidiaries. They're now using distributed ledger technology to do that. Great. That's one side of the bridge where it's love blockchain, hate crypto. When you start talking about crypto to the banking crowd, they kind of lose the will. Right?

Pete Townsend:
Then, you got crypto first with these Cryptopians that are like, they came out of the financial crisis and said, "We don't trust banks. We want to create our own money," so on and so forth. It feels like, for a time, that these two sides were going to meet. People were building a bridge from the crypto first and people were building a bridge from blockchain first, were trying to bring it together. I think if they don't come together, they're just going to keep building and we're going to have two bridges. No big deal.

Pete Townsend:
The blockchain and DLT component of it, I mean fintech, to me, is reinventing finance through technology. A core component of being able to reinvent finance through technology is saying, "What is the best technology stack for what it is that I'm building?" It may be distributed ledger technology. It may be a centralized database. It may just be building a wonderful UX, UI on top of somebody else's kit or just plugging in an API to something.

Paul Smyth:
Not to go too far off the fund side, and we've had a lot of the same thoughts around blockchain, there seems to be a blockchain trend at the minute where you stick blockchain into everything. I saw a recruitment blockchain idea there a while ago, and it makes no sense.

Pete Townsend:
No.

Paul Smyth:
It's just taking blockchain into something for the sake of saying blockchain.

Pete Townsend:
Yeah. I feel like I'm always a few months ahead of this. I feel like that blockchain hype cycle has come way up. It's then crashed. I think we now have a critical mass of people who are saying just what you're saying, which is you got to really be careful about - people just putting blockchain on something to try to get some hype around it. I think largely what I look at, and becoming part of this community now is really helpful, the venture capital community, you see where people are making investments.

Paul Smyth:
Yes.

Pete Townsend:
I always say that if I look at a deck for a startup that I may want to help, if I see the word blockchain mentioned on page one, it goes right in the bin. I want to see it on page eight or not at all when they talk about their tech stack and say, "This was the best solution for our value proposition."

Paul Smyth:
There's got to be a clear reason for it.

Pete Townsend:
Yes, I had a very interesting chat the other day with a guy who said, "Listen. I really think there's an opportunity to put blockchain on top of holiday homes in foreign countries."

Pete Townsend:
I said, "Well, tell me what problem you're solving." He told me the problem he's solving.

Pete Townsend:
I said, "Tell me how you're going to get this to your customer base," and he told me that.

Pete Townsend:
I said, "What does blockchain have to do with it?"

Pete Townsend:
It's like, "I don't know. I just think it's a great idea." Right?

Pete Townsend:
I had this conversation with an asset manager three or four months ago. It was a real estate thing as well. You got to be careful. There are 10 pages to any pitch deck that I go through religiously. What is your elevator pitch? What problem are you solving? What is your solution? How big is the market? What is your go-to-market plan, right? What is your business model? What is your team? What is your competition? What are your milestones? What is the ask?

Pete Townsend:
The only place you should be mentioning blockchain on that is when you're talking about pretty much capabilities of your team. If you say that, in your solution's slide that, "Listen, this is powered by Hyperledger or powered by Ethereum or powered by this Hedera Hashgraph blockchain protocol or DLT protocol," wonderful. The question I'm going to ask is, "How skilled are you guys in that? Do you have the expertise to be able to actually deliver that? Show me that in your team."

Pete Townsend:
Or if we know that that's going to need a big financial investment, how much money are you asking for? Is that realistic? Are you asking for a billion? Are you asking for 250,000? How long is that going to last you if you need to actually bring in five blockchain developers? I feel like, as I said, I'm always like three or four months ahead of this just because of how deep into it I am.

Paul Smyth:
In terms of the funds' industry, we're talking about investment managers and maybe that's a long term play to see genuine front office at scale in Ireland.

Pete Townsend:
Yes.

Paul Smyth:
We have the innovation side, which is being led outside of Ireland mainly.

Pete Townsend:
Yeah.

How To Stay Relevant In The Financial Services Industry

Paul Smyth:
It's going to happen to us. There is an opportunity there, I think, somewhere. You have blockchain, you have fintech. If you're sitting there as a transfer agent or as a fund accountant or in middle office or trade processing or whatever today, what is your advice for those people to stay relevant in the industry over the next one to three to five to 10 years?

Pete Townsend:
I like to think of someone I used to work with who shall not be named, but I said to her, because she was dealing with such crap, and I said, "How do you stay with it? I mean you're getting crap from that person. You've got all these IT problems, so on and so on and so on." She's like, "It's the customers. It's the clients. I love talking to them. I love feeling like we're sorting out a problem for them, even though it might have been a problem that we caused ourselves." Getting close to customers, getting close to clients, is highly advisable. Then, you figure out what their problems are and you figure out what really matters to them.

Pete Townsend:
Where the industry should be going is really defined by your customers, which are asset managers and wealth managers and anybody that's using the services of the funds' industry in Ireland, and getting as close as you can to them. I talked with someone in New York who had just built a brand-new fund administration platform. I'm like, "Okay, great. How long did that take?"

Pete Townsend:
He's like, "It took three years."

Pete Townsend:
I said, "During those three years, how many conversations did you have with the prospective clients?"

Pete Townsend:
Like, "None."

Pete Townsend:
I said, "Why not?"

Pete Townsend:
He said, "Because I already know what to build."

Pete Townsend:
I said, "How do you know that?"

Pete Townsend:
"Because I've been in the industry for 15 years."

Pete Townsend:
"How long has it been since you talked to a client?"

Pete Townsend:
"Well, I was always in tech... " Bing, problem. Okay, what do your customers actually need? I think if I am talking to someone in the funds' industry, I did this just actually a few months ago, and the conversation was along the lines of someone working for one of the big banks in fund administration, was thinking about moving on. I said, "Why?"

Pete Townsend:
They're like, "Well, I just think there are so many more opportunities elsewhere."

Pete Townsend:
"Well, why is that? Tell me what you're working on." Over the course of the conversation, what we got down to was there are actually loads of opportunities. The guy was 30 years old. He was looking towards going to the next five years before him and his girlfriend got married and they started having kids and it was prime earning time.

Paul Smyth:
Yeah.

Pete Townsend:
Learn as much as you can, connect with as many senior folks as you can in your employer and ask them what they do, ask them what their perspectives are. The stuff that you learn is amazing. Try to find a mentor, try to find someone who is connected really to what's going on in the outside world, outside of the everyday life of the funds' industry in Ireland, with what's really happening out there and what's really coming towards us.

Pete Townsend:
I would highly recommend that, go to meetups, get onto Meetup.com, find topics that you're interested in, get out there and talk to like-minded people. It doesn't have to be all, "Oh my God. I am such a professional geek." It can be, "Hey. I'm going to meet some pretty cool people that might be interested in the same thing as me." Does that mean you have to change jobs? No. You go to work each day. If you're not happy doing what you do at that job, get a new one. Right? Or find a way to increase your level of happiness and engagement in what it is that you're doing. Don't waste your time. If you can find ways to go bring the outside world and these wonderful new things to bear in your current role, by all means, do it.

Moving From Fund Admin - Fund Services To Front Office

Paul Smyth:
I have to ask, you've made the transition from fund admin, fund services to the front office side of things.

Pete Townsend:
Yeah.

Paul Smyth:
In my, 13 years or so of recruitment, I constantly see people, three or so years into fund accounting, they’ve done Level One CFA, and they want to be a trader. I see it all the time. How do you make that change? How do you know you need to make that change?

Pete Townsend:
You don't. It's almost like listening... It's the Irish mammy thing, right? Which is: you should be a doctor...

Paul Smyth:
Why do we always talk about Irish mammies?!

Pete Townsend:
I don't know. You should be a doctor, you should be an accountant, you should be a lawyer so go do that. Why did I go this path? It's like, "Well, I thought I was going to be a stockbroker. Then, when I started at Fidelity, I thought I was going to be a portfolio manager." What I found was that working with people was far more compelling to me than working with numbers, doing research on technology rather than companies' financials and where things were going. Now, that's led me a different path now obviously. Doing research on technology was far more interesting than doing financial statement analysis and stuff like that.

Pete Townsend:
I kind of found my path through people and technology, right? I had a chat with a good friend of mine from Fidelity, where I started my career about four years ago before I started down this path. He's been in Fidelity for 30 years now nearly on the front office side and deeper, very high up there in the industry. He said, "Pete, I was always envious of you. You're always out there talking to so many different clients and so many different people from different walks of life across the asset management industry." He said he always ever had one client, which was Fidelity.

Pete Townsend:
He's like, "You're just getting so much diversity there." If you're thinking about moving into an asset manager, to go work in their operations, which is what you are qualified to do, you are not a portfolio manager, it's the same. It is the same stuff, dealing with the same problems, but you're getting more people shouting at you because there's so much more at stake with one to 2% management fee and perhaps, on a hedge fund, 20% performance fee.

Paul Smyth:
Yes.

Pete Townsend:
Right? There's much more pressure. Just if you think that your own self-worth and how you perceive yourself will be increased from moving from the back and middle office to the front office, think again chuck. Okay?

Pete Townsend:
Now, if you find your path and say, "Actually, I'm not a big fan of operational processing. I'm not a big fan of a continuous push for quality improvement, of cost management, of perhaps being on the relationship management side, solving asset managers' problems and helping them and selling." It's all of those types of things, which an outsourcing business does, if I'm not motivated and thrilled by the prospect of doing that long term and leading people towards that, what else am I going to do? What is that really excites me?

Pete Townsend:
I had this chat with somebody years ago who was about to leave BNP, a great guy. I asked him: "Dude, what really motivates you? What do you like?"

Pete Townsend:
He's like, "I love playing football."

Pete Townsend:
I said, "Okay. When do you do that?"

Pete Townsend:
He's like, "After work."

Pete Townsend:
I said, "Are you going to play for Man United?"

Pete Townsend:
He's like, "No."

Pete Townsend:
I said, "Well, how do you bring some of your enjoyment of that into the workplace?" He handed in his resignation, so obviously, BNP Paribas wasn't the place for him to do that. He's now with KB Associates or somewhere cool like that, I think. Great guy. I was trying to challenge him to find his opus. What is it that we might be able to plug into that you really enjoy as an individual, whatever it might be, where we can find some goal symmetry between yourselves, what you want to do as an individual and what motivates and gives you a buzz, and what would actually create some value for the company.

Paul Smyth:
People don't think about that enough.

Pete Townsend:
They don't. They've got to be brave.

Closing Advice & Values

Paul Smyth:
What are your values?

Pete Townsend:
Be assertive, diplomatic and considerate and respectful at the same time, because we're all humans here. You really need to just think about yourself, what is it that you want to be doing? What is going to make you happy? Lisa White, who was on the Money Never Sleeps podcast with us, talked about 15% of employees are actually engaged, fully engaged, in what they do. That number needs to go up. I've spoken with people recently that are being treated terribly, that I've had this chat with, if you don't see an opportunity for you to grow in this organization, move. If you do see one, go for it. Right?

Paul Smyth:
Great. Thanks, Pete, really appreciate your time.

Pete Townsend:
My pleasure.

Connect With Pete

Pete's website is TheStartup.com.

Check out the excellent podcast co-hosted by Pete and Eoin Fitzgerald, Money Never Sleeps.

You can also find Pete on LinkedIn.

Looking For A New Role In Ireland?

If you want any information or are interested in one of our roles in the Fintech and financial services industry, get in touch with us at Top Tier Recruitment.

Check out our podcast and, if there's ever anything that you would like discussed, feel free to get in touch, info@ttrmail.com.

Categories